Thursday, 9 June 2011

DRDO: Prithvi accuracy better than 10 metres

The DRDO official press release is reproduced below.


New Delhi: Jyaistha 19, 1933

Wednesday, June 09, 2011

The surface to surface Prithvi (P-II) Missile was successfully flight tested this morning at 9 am from Launch Complex-III at the Interim Test Range (ITR), Chandipur in Balasore District of Orissa. The Launch was carried out as part of the regular training exercise of the Armed Forces.

Prithvi-II, the first indigenous surface to surface strategic Missile, capable of attacking targets at ranges of 350 kms, reached the predefined target in the Bay of Bengal with a very high accuracy of better than 10 meters. All the Radars, Electro-optical systems located along the coast have tracked and monitored the Missile throughout the flight path. An Indian Naval ship located near the target witnessed the final event.

The entire launch operations of the Missile were carried out by the Armed Forces, monitored by the Scientists of DRDO. The flight test of the Prithvi-II met all the Mission objectives and was like a text book launch. Dr. V.K. Saraswat, Scientific Adviser to Raksha Mantri and Secretary Defence R & D, witnessed the launch operations and congratulated the Armed Forces and Scientists for the successful flight test. Shri VLN Rao, Programme Director AD, Shri SK Ray, Director RCI, top officials of Strategic Force Command and DRDO were present during the Mission.

The Defence Minister Shri AK Antony has congratulated the Armed Forces and Scientists for the successful flight test.


Mr. Ra said...

Pretty good accuracy, so that it can enter directly in to a terrorist den or in to an inimical silo or any premium target with any kind of warhead.

Anonymous said...

Statistical spoilsport says n = 1, with multiple firing considered the value may rise. The CEP will also vary with range.

Anonymous said...

this is a ballistic missile? in that case it just calls for a project to develop ship-finding radar sensors and turning it into an ASBM.

joydeep ghosh said...

Ajai sir

is it true that DRDO is developing a 6000 km Agni 6.

By the Way is Prithvi 1 out of service

glad to get an answer


Joydeep Ghosh

Pratik Das said...

To Anonymous @ 10 June 2011 00:14,

This accuracy for the Prithvi-II is not new and the Prithvi-II itself is not new. The missile has been tested many times before and n >> 1.

You ought to do some research lest you appear oversmart.

Broadsword said...

@Joydeep Ghosh

No. And no.

Anonymous said...

who cares about CEP....what is the RTD aka Radius of Total Destruction?

Anonymous said...

It appears that the prithvi II is still in development. If the missile was 100% reliable, there would be no need for the head honchos of the GOI to be invited.

Mr. Ra said...

I think we will never be in a position to hit Papistan with Prithvi loaded with conventional weapons as it will be retaliated with nukes. So we will have the only choice to hit them with Prithvi loaded with nukes. In such cases the question of accurate CEP may not be really important.

Anonymous said...

Good accuracy provided the enemy gives you enough time and space to fuel and launch the dam thing. why do we keep testing this V2 copy when rest of the world has moved on except states like Iran and North Korea.

Pratik Das said...

To Mr. Ra,

Busting open a nuclear bunker door requires very low CEP, since the bunker doors are usually designed to withstand anything but a direct hit. While the Brahmos could do this, the Prithvi-II has a wider diameter, carries more payload, goes 60 km further according to the nominal ranges.

To Anonymous @ 12 June 2011 21:06,

Even if the enemy was to attack us by surprise with a nuclear weapon, you can be sure that the reaction time within the civilian government will be long enough for the Prithvis to be mobilised and fuelled for a tactical nuclear response.

The bottleneck is not in fuelling the missile but in deciding to launch it.

The solid-fuelled Agni-III is ever-ready for a strategic response, which could include hitting first and asking questions later, but the will to do so must exist.

The Shaurya solid-fuelled missile is said to have a CEP of 20 to 30 m.